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February 26, 2020
After working in multiline showrooms for 12 years, Katrena Griggs became the vice president of showroom operations for wholesale brand Codarus in 2015, and then launched her own company, Curated Home Brands, three years later. Though the brand is young, when she saw a chance to open her own space in Atlanta last August, she jumped.
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February 21, 2020
High-end furniture and decor brand Kathy Kuo Home has been profitable (and self-funded) since its founding in 2012. In 2019, Kuo met with investors to explore fundraising that could grow the business even faster—but ultimately decided to pursue a different route.
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February 12, 2020
Christopher Peacock, founder of his eponymous Norwalk, Connecticut–based cabinetry brand, had the good fortune to sell his company to British furniture maker Smallbone at the top of the market in September 2008—and the ill fortune to get caught up in the new owner’s subsequent bankruptcy just months later. Here’s how he brought his company back from the brink (and then some).
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February 7, 2020
Admit it: You’ve got entrepreneur fever. You’ve always had a great idea for a business kicking around in the back of your head, maybe something that could transform the industry, or at least turn a tidy profit—if only you had the money to get it off the ground. Before you start playing chicken with your credit limit, check out this list of ways design world entrepreneurs are getting funded, how they work—and what to watch out for.
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January 31, 2020
Interior design can be a tough business, but there’s plenty of opportunity (and profit) out there if you know where to look—and how to ask for it. Just ask iconic decorator Elsie de Wolfe, who, in one morning, landed what may be the biggest design commission ever. All it took was a little hustle.
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January 22, 2020
For Lee Mayer, who co-founded Denver-based e-design platform Havenly with her sister Emily Motayed in 2014, operating her startup far from Silicon Valley has offered her a different perspective. Instead of falling prey to groupthink, the self- described contrarian made a marketing move that was nearly unheard of at the time: not spending a dime on new customer acquisition.
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