business of home | Mar 16, 2018 |
Q&A: What tech innovations have transformed your workday?
Q&A: What tech innovations have transformed your workday?

Gearing Up “The tool that has changed our design accuracy and presentation clarity the most has been the use of virtual reality goggles. When we put the Samsung Gear VR device on our clients, they are immediately immersed in the space—there are no longer any unknowns left up to interpretation. The result is a clear understanding of the finished space for the contractor, real-time feedback from our clients, and zero instances of surprise or disappointment when the project is delivered.” —Patrick Sutton

Q&A: What tech innovations have transformed your workday?

Passing Notes “The iAnnotate note-taking app has allowed me to work more efficiently. I can quickly mark up documents and send them to my office or to contractors, highlighting areas that need to be reviewed or leaving comments in red ink. It’s genius! In a project we are designing at 56 Leonard in New York, I realized that, because the master bedroom’s closet had been reconfigured, the custom built-ins weren’t going to fit. I was able to make notes immediately to show how reducing the bookshelves by 9 inches each would make it all fit—all without being near my computer. I then emailed the project manager at my office and the millwork shop at the same time, so everyone got the information in less than an hour.” —Richard Mishaan

Q&A: What tech innovations have transformed your workday?

Slacking On “We moved all of our internal communication off of email and onto Slack last year. It has vastly improved and streamlined the information flow for our teams, saves huge amounts of time, and helps us prioritize messaging and tasks. I also use the iAnnotate app to review, redline and add notes to our drawings—whether I’m in the office, at the job site or in the air. It’s quick and efficient, and allows me to use flight time in a way that I never could with paper plans.” —Tom Stringer

Q&A: What tech innovations have transformed your workday?

Insta Clients “We have fallen in love with Instagram, both as a communication tool to explain what we do and to share what inspires us. We have one client who found us through Instagram, and many others who have admitted to evaluating our feed before meeting, so it works on both an artistic level and on a business level. Potential clients who look us up on Instagram get an immediate sense of who we are and what is possible.” —Katie Lydon

Q&A: What tech innovations have transformed your workday?

Reality Check “Reality TV has been a game changer for many of our businesses. It gives consumers a glance into expensive, well-designed homes and leaves them wondering how they can recreate those looks in their own spaces. (Let’s face it, MTV’s “Real World” introduced an entire generation of teenagers to loft living, cool furniture, mod lighting, big artwork and chic accessories. And millions of people across the country know who Martyn Lawrence Bullard is not because they subscribe to a shelter magazine, but because they watch one of the Kardashian shows.) The desire to live in a pulled-together home has encouraged people to work with an interior designer, which they may not have considered before.” —Libby Langdon

Q&A: What tech innovations have transformed your workday?

Clip Art “We changed our management software to IvyMark and it has changed the way we do business. Rather than using several separate programs, IvyMark integrates it all—we’re able to stay on top of billing, get paid faster, organize furniture schedules and more. Plus, the Ivy Clipper tool allows us to search for product from any manufacturer, then grab images and information we need to create a beautiful tear sheet for our clients. Moving to a new system can be daunting, but now that we are up and running, I’m happy to have made the switch.” —Kim Radovich

Q&A: What tech innovations have transformed your workday?

Easier than CAD “We’ve been using SketchUp to create fully developed 3-D drawings. It takes a little time to get used to, but is an easy program to learn. We’re producing better designs because we can really see and manipulate details. It’s been a game changer for our clients, too, as it’s so much easier for them to get excited and move forward with design schemes that they can easily envision.” —Catherine Davin 

Photography Patrick Sutton: Dean Alexander; Tom Stringer: Jorge Gera; Richard Mishaan: Ben Fink Shapiro; Katy Lydon: Willy Somma; Kim Radovich: Lana Rowe 

This article originally appeared in Spring 2018 issue of Business of Home, Issue 7. Subscribe for more.

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